From: KELSALL@mailgate.navsses.navy.mil (Kelsall, Lawrence)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 15:59 EST
To: deis@rci.rutgers.edu
Subject: Amarone recipes

Hi Frank,

I didn't follow recipes per se, but as it turns out, one of my guests asked for me to write them down as well. At the moment I'm trying to get them down on paper/computer, so I'll email you again in a day or two with the goods. I'm more than happy to share with you!

A little background on the Amarone Dinner:

I wanted to choose a menu that went with the wine, so game seemed the obvious choice. At various times over the summer, I had 3 rabbits, 2 ducks, and a few whole chickens, which I butchered and froze all the bones/carcasses for stock. A week before the dinner I made a game stock from these bones. Also about a week before, I made a some duck breasts for dinner, which I separated from a whole duck, and made a confit out of the meat from the remainder. I also had half a rabbit in the freezer which I combined with the duck confit for the ravioli filling. (Jump to Ravioli recipes)

I've always loved gorgonzola with amarone. The soufflés are just your basic soufflé concept. The idea for the phyllo pastry is actually from a recipe I got out of a book about becoming a chef. It called for Maytag blue cheese, but I used gorgonzola in keeping with the Italian theme. I've made these soufflés in the past with roquefort, and you could probably use any other blue or strong flavored cheese. (Jump to Soufflé Recipe).

I was thinking of making beef, but there is a butcher in the Italian market in Phila who specializes in game, and he sells farm raised venison tenderloin (cervena) from New Zealand. "Cervena" is a region in New Zealand (like Champagne in France) known for its venison. It's a bit pricey ($24/lb) but I had never cooked with it and wanted to try it out. I thought of chateaubriand when I made it, that is, I seared the whole loin, then roasted it in the oven. I didn't make the classic chateaubriand sauce, but did a red wine reduction. Its meant to be eaten rare to med-rare, and because there is not much fat in venison, it cooks VERY fast. Unfortunately, I overcooked mine (I was totaly p*ssed!)....but live and learn, I'll get em next time! (Jump to Venison Recipe)

Anyway, I'll get you the recipes in a day or two!

Larry

(Kelsall@mailgate.navsses. navy.mil)


Greetings Frank!

Here is the first of the three recipes. I haven't really tested the quantities, I just kinda estimated from memory, so adjust anything if you feel it's necessary. If you don't have duck/rabbit stock for the velouté sauce, chicken stock will also work. The other recipes will follow.

___________________________

DUCK, RABBIT and WILD MUSHROOM RAVIOLI

and ASIAGO RAVIOLI

in a TOMATO/DUCK VELOUTÉ SAUCE

The Meat Ravioli:

* Reserve the duck breat for another meal. This is the best meat and should not be used for confit.

Preheat oven to 400 degF. Cut the duck and rabbit into 4 or 5 large pieces and fry in a dutch oven or skillet to render some fat. Transfer into oven and roast for about 35-40 mins until meat is cooked through. Drain the fat and reserve. Set the meat aside to cool. When cooled, pick the meat from the bones, dice into small pieces and place into a bowl. Salt and pepper the meat and pour some of the fat over the mixture to make a confit. You should have about 1 cup of confit. This will keep in the fridge for about 1 week or freeze for 2 months. Reserve about 3 additional tblsp of the fat for veloute sauce.

Make the pasta dough and wrap in plastic wrap and let set in the fridge for at least 20 mins.

Wash and clean the mushrooms, removing any grit and remove the dark gills found in portobellos and criminis. Remove the stems from the shiitakis. Cut mushrooms into 1 inch pieces and process in a food processor until roughly chopped. Saute the shallots in the olive oil until tender. Combine duck/rabbit confit, mushrooms, parsley, parmigano-reggiano and shallots in a bowl and mix thoroughly. Salt and pepper to taste.

Roll out the pasta and cut ravioli using the desired method/shape. Fill the dough with the confit/mushroom mixture and seal making sure no air pockets are present. All ingredients should make about 12 large (3 inch) ravioli. Set ravioli aside to dry for at least 1/2 hr or freeze for up to 1 month. If frozen, do not thaw before boiling. Boil the ravioli in salted water for about 7-10 mins until al-dente.

The Cheese Ravioli:

Make the pasta dough and wrap in plastic wrap and let set in the fridge for at least 20 mins. Grate the cheese. Roll out the pasta and cut ravioli using the desired method/shape. Fill the dough with the cheese and seal making sure no air pockets are present. All ingredients should make about 6 large (3 inch) ravioli. Set ravioli aside to dry for at least 1/2 hr or freeze for up to 1 month. If frozen, do not thaw before boiling. Boil the ravioli in salted water for about 7-10 mins until al-dente.

The Velouté Sauce:

Heat the fat in a heavy skillet until melted. Add the flour and stir vigorously until fat and flour are well combined to make a roux. Cook the roux over medium heat to a light brown or blonde color. Add the cold stock and wine and stir until smooth. Cook for about 20 minutes until the sauce easiliy coats the back of a wooden spoon. Salt and pepper to taste. The sauce can be made up to 1 day ahead up to this point and refrigerated. Score the skin of each tomato by cutting an "x" in the top. Blanch the tomatos in boiling water for 25 seconds. Remove the tomatos from the water and let cool. You should be able to easily peel the skin from the tomato like a banana. Remove skin and seeds and cut tomatoes into medium dice, trying to reserve some of the juice. Remove the sauce from the heat and toss in the diced tomatos with some of the juice.

Assembling the Dish:

Arrange two duck/rabbit/mushroom ravioli and one asiago ravioli in a shallow bowl. Spoon some of the sauce over the ravioli and garnish with chopped basil.

Serves 6 as an appetizer

Jump to Top, or Venison. Or continue below to Soufflé.


WARM GORGONZOLA SOUFFLÉ in a PHYLLO PASTRY

with MIXED GREENS and BALSAMIC/RASPBERRY VINAGRETTE

The Soufflés:

Place one sheet of phyllo dough on work surface and brush with clarified/melted butter. Continue stacking phyllo sheets and brush butter between each sheet until stacked six sheets high. Cut the stack into 4x4 inch squares. Butter six soufflé ramekins or cup-cake molds and line each with a 4x4 square of the phyllo pastry. Refrigerate the phyllo molds for at least 1/2 hr. In a bowl, combine remaining ingredients and with a hand held mixer, mix until smooth and creamy. Pour the mixture into the formed phyllo cups and bake in a 350 degF oven for about 15 mins until puffed and golden. Serve immediately with the mixed greens.

The Balsamic Vinagrette:

Whisk all ingredients until emulsified and toss with the mixed greens.

Assembling the dish:

While the soufflés are baking, arrange salad in a circular pattern on a plate with the olives. Cut the roasted peppers into long thin strips and arrange in a spoke pattern around the plate. Carefully remove the soufflés from each mold and place on top of the salad, in the center of the plate.

Serves six as an appetizer or salad course

Jump to Top, Ravioli, Soufflé, or continue below to Venison.


ROASTED LOIN OF VENISON in a RED WINE VEAL REDUCTION

with SHIITAKI MUSHROOM, GARLIC and HERB SALSA

The Reduction Sauce:

* Demi-Glace Gold is a pre-reduced veal stock/demi-glace. It can be purchased at many food specialty stores or by mail order from Gateway Gourmet (http://gatewaygourmet. com/demi.htm)

Great stuff!!!

Gently saute the shallots, thyme, parsley, pepper and mushrooms in the butter and olive oil over low heat in a heavy skillet until tender, about 10 mins. Add the wine, increase heat and simmer until reduced to 2 or 3 tablespoons, about 20 mins. Add the stock and simmer until reduced to 1 cup, about 2 hrs. (If using demi-glace gold, about 1/2 hr). Strain the sauce into a clean saucepan and set aside. Will keep in refrigerator for about 2 weeks. When ready to serve, re-heat the sauce and add the butter in pieces. Gently stir the sauce until the butter is melted and incorporated. Serve at once.

Mushroom Salsa:

Clean and de-stem the mushrooms (reserve stems for sauce). Cut thin slices of the mushrooms and saute in 2 tablespoons of the olive oil over high heat for about 2 minutes. Add garlic and 1 tablespoon each of wine and stock and continue to saute until liquid is almost evaporated, being careful not to burn the garlic. Add another tablespoon each of wine and stock and a little more olive oil if necessary and continue to saute 1-2 mins. Add last amount of wine/stock and chopped herbs, sauteing for another 1-2 minutes, or until mushrooms are tender and a light sauce has formed. Salt and pepper to taste.

Preparing the venison:

Marinate the loin in the olive oil, rosemary and garlic for about 2 hrs in the refrigerator. Pre-heat oven to 325 degF. Salt and pepper the meat and sear over high heat in a dutch oven or heavy skillet for a minute or two on each side until a light crust has formed. Place the skillet with the meat in the oven for about 20 minutes for medium rare (or until a meat thermometer reads 130 degF in the center). Remove from the oven and let the meat rest for at least 10 mins before slicing.

* As an alternate, you can grill the loin after marinating. Pre-heat a gas or charcoal grill. Salt and pepper the meat and grill for about 15 mins until medium rare. Let the meat rest for at least 10 mins before slicing.

Assembling the dish:

Pour some of the sauce onto a plate. Place a spoonful of the mushroom salsa over the sauce. Slice the venison loin into 1/4 inch thick slices and arrange a few slices over the salsa. Garnish with a sprig of fresh thyme or basil leaf. Serve with creamy parmigiano-reggiano polenta

Serves six as a main course


Put into HTML by Frank Deis on Jan 5, 1999

Jump to Top, Ravioli, Soufflé, or Venison.