Fonseca Lab in the News

6/26/2013:

Health officials warn about invasion of the Asian tiger mosquito

Examiner.com

The Aedes albopictus gets its nick-name, the Asian tiger mosquito because of the black-and-white stripes on its body. It was first brought to Texas in a shipment of tires according to the Wall Street Journal. On Wednesday, media outlets warned about the pests invading the east coast. The WSJ reports unlike other mosquitoes, the aggressive Asian tiger bites all day long, from morning until night. Dina Fonseca, associate professor of entomology at Rutgers University, tells the WSJ, "Part of the reason it is called 'tiger' is also because it is very aggressive. You can try and swat it all you want, but once it's on you, it doesn't let go."

Asian Tiger Mosquitoes as Ferocious as their Namesakes

GuardianLV.com

Asian mosquitoes are as ferocious as their namesakes, tigers - and they're the latest disease-carrying pest to invade the United States in droves. The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), which was first brought to Texas in a shipment of tires (in the rain water that collects inside the rims) in the 1980s. They have black-and-white stripes on their bodies. They have currently invaded twenty eastern states in America, and at the rate they're advancing, they will soon come to yours...According to Dina Fonseca, associate professor of entomology at Rutgers University, "Part of the reason it is called 'tiger' is also because it is very aggressive. You can try and swat it all you want, but once it's on you, it doesn't let go."

Warren County prepares for summer mosquito outbreaks

LehighValleyLive.com

Jennifer Gruener, superintendent of Warren County's Mosquito Control Commission, said the area's nine inches of rainfall since May does not bode well for mosquito containment. "It's going to get worse because of the rain we've had that produced river overflow, pool filling and a lot of freshwater," she said...John Worobey, a Rutgers University professor of Nutritional Sciences, and Dina Fonseca and Randy Gaugler, with the school's Center for Vector Biology experts from 2009 to 2011, linked the presence of Asian tiger mosquitoes as a contributing factor to childhood obesity. The study, which compared outdoor activity of a mosquito-controlled area with a noncontrolled area, found that children exposed to the day-biting mosquito spent 63 percent less time outside playing.

6/25/2013:

Get ready for invading Asian tiger mosquitoes

CBSNews.com

There's a new pest in town and it is about as menacing as it sounds: the Asian tiger mosquito. Named for the black-and-white stripes on its body, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) was first brought to Texas in a shipment of tires (which are notorious for holding the standing water that mosquitoes require for breeding), the Wall Street Journal reports. The bug is worrisome for several reasons: Unlike other mosquitoes, the aggressive Asian tiger bites all day long, from morning until night. It has a real bloodlust for humans, but also attacks dogs, cats, birds and other animals."Part of the reason it is called 'tiger' is also because it is very aggressive, Dina Fonseca, associate professor of entomology at Rutgers University, told the Journal. "You can try and swat it all you want, but once it's on you, it doesn't let go."