1.2.9-11: FIRST ACCUSATION: Accuses Socrates of teaching his companions to despise the established law.

1.2.12-16:  Uses Alcibiades and Critias to support his accusation.

1.2.17-23: Defense of Socrates against accusation of teaching companions to despise the established law.

1.2.24-48: Defense of Socrates in the case of Alcibiades and Critias.

1.2.42-46: Definition of a law.
1.2.49: SECOND ACCUSATION: Accuses Socrates of "teaching sons to treat their fathers with contempt".
1.2.50:  Defense of Socrates against accusation of "teaching sons to treat their fathers with contempt".
1.2.51-52: THIRD ACCUSATION: Accuses Socrates of causing his companions to dishonor relations other than fathers.
1.2.53-55: Rationalization for Socratesí behavior in response to the accusation that he caused his companions to dishonor other relations.
1.2.56: FOURTH ACCUSATION: Accuses Socrates by using immoral passages of famous poets to teach his companions to be tyrants and malefactors.
1.2.57: Defense of Socrates by explaining the line of poetry used as an example.
1.2.58: Uses another example of a line of poetry to accuse Socrates of using immoral passages of famous poets to teach his companions to be tyrants and malefactors.
1.2.59-61: Defense against second example of Socrates using immoral passages of poetry to teach his companions to be tyrants and malefactors.