Globalization: Nationhood & Markets
A Graduate Seminar in Sociology [On the web since January 1, 2000 // this is version 1/15/2000]
Rutgers, Spring 2000; 16.920.571
Tuesdays, 4:10-6:50, Lucy Stone Hall A 256
Convenor: József Böröcz

email: jborocz@rci.rutgers.edu

445-2435 or 932-1367
office hour: Wednesdays, 1-2pm at B207 LSH
or by appt via email


This is a graduate reading-and-discussion seminar on the sociology of some of the largest social institutions we know. 'Globalization' refers to a combination of (1) the consequences of what David Harvey calls the "time-space compression" of our world-the fact that flows of all kinds circle the globe with previously unseen speed-and (2) transformations in the institutional setup that serve to foster, stem, regulate and otherwise influence such flows. Nationhood-the socially constructed community of a population imagined as primordial-and markets-the socially constructed venue of the encounter between profit-seeking sellers and buyers imagined as unconnected except through prices-with their, at times joint, at others contending, claims of control over states, borders and flows, are two of the most powerful such institutions. This course makes modest inroads into, and will aim to provide, at best, a general orientation in, the vast territory of the macrosociology of such institutions.

The purpose of the course is gaining literacy, devising critique and inspiration. You are expected to:


Grading is a judicious combination of your contribution to the discussions, your presentations, homeworks and your paper.

Paper: Write a 2500-3000 word research paper about a subject of your choice within the macrosociology of globalization. Make some theoretical proposition and some empirical observation to bear on each other in a way that is relevant to some literature in this area of research. Please submit your one-paragraph topic statement by the time of the 8th class meeting-March 8-the class before Spring Break. Please use my office hours for discussions of possible topics, problems and solutions as soon as they occur to you. Deadline for paper: 4pm, May 1 (a.k.a. International Labor Day).



Schedule
 

week 1: 1/18 Course, Topics, Participants
 

Film: The Battle of Algiers (Italian, dir: Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966, 135 min)

Homework (deadline = 1/25, hand in in class) Write a 600-word review of The Battle of Algiers as for the way it deals with



week 2: 1/25                                 Shedding Global Veils

Readings for Class Discussion:  



week 3: 2/1                                 Globalization: A World-System Process
 

Readings:  

 

week 4: 2/8                                         Globalization: CULTURE
 

Reading:
 



week 5: 2/15                                     Globalization: Borders and Flows
 

Readings:
 



week 6: 2/22                                                 Monies, Global and Otherwise
 

Readings:
 



week 7: 2/29                                       Global Hegemonies: The Geopolitics of Flows
 

Reading:
 

Reminder: Your paper proposal is due next week!



week 8: 3/7                                         Nationhood: Invention of 'Bad History'
 

Readings:


Spring Recess



week 9: 3/21                                      Nationhood: A Collective Imaginary / Institution / Event

Readings:



week 10: 3/28                                     Nationhood: Coloniality

Readings:



week 11: 4/4                                     Nationhood, Markets & Sovereignty

Readings:



week 12: 4/11                                 Nationalism: A Deadend

Readings:



week 13: 4/18                                     'Really Existing' Stalinism: The Etatist Deadend
 

Readings:



week 14: 4/25                                     Contesting Global Forces-Is It Possible?

Readings: