2007

840:352 RELIGION AND SCIENCE

Dr. James W. Jones

Fall, 2007

Office Hours, M 1:00 – 3:00, and other times by appointment, Loree 136

Phone: 732-932-9623. Please use this phone number and not email to contact Dr. Jones.

 

Readings.  The following books have been ordered at the Douglass Bookstore

Ian Barbour, When Science Meets Religion.

Holmes Rolston, Science and Religion: A Critical Survey

Michael Ruse, Can A Darwinian be a Christian?

James W. Jones, Waking From Newton’s Sleep: Dialogues on Spirituality in an Age of

              Science

 

Requirements.  Each class period will be devoted to both lecture and discussion. Students are expected to have done the reading and come to class prepared with questions and comments for discussion. This is one of the reasons the class is being kept small. Class participation will be part of the final grade.  There will be three brief (approximately 8-10 pages) essays due, as marked on the syllabus. The topic for the final essay will be given out the last day of class. No extensions will be given on any assignments.

 

Essays. One of the purposes of this course to help students learn to think critically about the relationships between religion and science. The essays will require students to critically evaluate and discuss various aspects of this relationship. Each of the three required essays must contain at least three components: (1) reference to the specifics of the texts that you are evaluating, and not a just report of general conclusions; (2)discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the argument made there; and (3)discussion of the implications of this article for the relationship between science and religion. No readings or references beyond the course material should be consulted. Students are required to do their own analysis and evaluation of the material. Violations of the university policy on academic integrity will be dealt with severely. The University Policy can be found at http://TeachX.rutgers.edu/integrity/index.himl.

 

Note: All cell phones, pagers, etc. must be turned off in class. Anyone whose device goes off during class will be asked to leave for the remainder of that period.

 

                                          COURSE OUTLINE

 

                                  Knowledge in Religion and Science

 

9/10 – 10/1 [Note: no class on 9/24]

J. W. Jones. The Texture of Knowledge, chapters 1-4, 6 (electronic reserve).

Holmes Rolston, Science and Religion: A Critical Survey, Chapter 1.

James W. Jones, Waking From Newton’s Sleep: Dialogues on Spirituality in an Age of

              Science

 

                 

                  Matter and Spirit

10/8-10/15

J. W. Jones, The Redemption of Matter,  chapters 4, 5, 6 (electronic reserve)

Ian Barbour, When Science Meets Religion, chapters 3 & 6.

Holmes Rolston, Science and Religion: A Critical Survey, chapter 2.

F. Capra, “Emptiness and form,” from The Tao of Physics, chapter 14. (electronic

              reserve).

J. Polkinghorne, “Does God act in the physical world” from Belief in God in an Age of

                           Science (electronic reserve).

 

10/22 First paper, an 8-10 page essay on the following topic:  F. Capra, “Emptiness and form,”  and J. Polkinghorne, “Does God act in the physical world” both seek to articulate the relationship between an ultimate reality and the physical  world that is congruent with modern science. Critically compare and contrast their approaches to this question. Where do they agree and disagree? Whose argument, if any, is more successful and why. Essay is due at the beginning of class today. No extensions will be given.

 

                                   Life and Evolution

10/22 –11/5

H. Rolston, Science and Religion, chapter 3

Ian Barbour, When Science Meets Religion, chapter 4.

Michael Ruse, Can A Darwinian be a Christian? Chapters 1, 3-7, 11-12, epilogue.

 

11/12. Second paper, an 8-10 page essay on the following topic? H. Rolston, Science and Religion, chapter 3, and M. Ruse, Can A Darwinian be a Christian? Seek to reconcile Christianity with evolutionary theory. What are the similarities and differences in their approaches. Who is more convincing and why? Or is this an impossible project. Essay is due at the beginning of class today. No extensions will be given.

 

                                          Mind, Brain, and Soul

11/12-11/26 [No class 11/19]

J.W. Jones, “Mind, Brain and Spirit – A clinician’s Perspective – Or why I am not afraid of Dualism”  from Soul, Psyche, Brain. (electronic Reserve)

Ian Barbour, When Science Meets Religion, chapter 5.

                             

                           Beyond the warfare of Religion and Science

12/3-12/10

Ian Barbour, When Science Meets Religion, chapter 1.

H. Rolston, Science and Religion, chapters 6, 7

J. W. Jones, The Redemption of Matter, chapter 7

 

12/10 Last day of class. Topic for the final essay will be handed out.

 

12/17 Final essays due in the Religion Dept. office by noon today. No extensions will be given.

 

 

 

840:352 RELIGION AND SCIENCE 2006

Dr. James W. Jones

Fall, 2006

Office Hours, M 1:00 – 3:00, and other times by appointment, Loree 136

Phone: 732-932-9623. Please use this phone number and not email to contact Dr. Jones.

 

Readings.  The following books have been ordered at the Douglass Bookstore

Ian Barbour, When Science Meets Religion.

Holmes Rolston, Science and Religion: A Critical Survey

Michael Ruse, Can A Darwinian be a Christian?

James W. Jones, Waking From Newton’s Sleep: Dialogues on Spirituality in an Age of

              Science

 

Requirements.  Each class period will be devoted to both lecture and discussion. Students are expected to have done the reading and come to class prepared with questions and comments for discussion. This is one of the reasons the class is being kept small. Class participation will be part of the final grade.  There will be three brief (approximately 8-10 pages) essays due, as marked on the syllabus. The topic for the final essay will be given out the last day of class. No extensions will be given on any assignments.

 

Essays. One of the purposes of this course to help students learn to think critically about the relationships between religion and science. The essays will require students to critically evaluate and discuss various aspects of this relationship. Each of the three required essays must contain at least three components: (1) reference to the specifics of the texts that you are evaluating, and not a just report of general conclusions; (2)discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the argument made there; and (3)discussion of the implications of this article for the relationship between science and religion. No readings or references beyond the course material should be consulted. Students are required to do their own analysis and evaluation of the material. Violations of the university policy on academic integrity will be dealt with severely. The University Policy can be found at http://TeachX.rutgers.edu/integrity/index.himl.

 

Note: All cell phones, pagers, etc. must be turned off in class. Anyone whose device goes off during class will be asked to leave for the remainder of that period.

 

                                          COURSE OUTLINE

 

 

                                  Knowledge in Religion and Science

9/11 – 9/25

J. W. Jones. The Texture of Knowledge, chapters 1-4, 6 (electronic reserve).

Holmes Rolston, Science and Religion: A Critical Survey, Chapter 1.

James W. Jones, Waking From Newton’s Sleep: Dialogues on Spirituality in an Age of

              Science

 

                 

                  Matter and Spirit

10/2-10/9

J. W. Jones, The Redemption of Matter,  chapters 4, 5, 6 (electronic reserve)

Ian Barbour, When Science Meets Religion, chapters 3 & 6.

Holmes Rolston, Science and Religion: A Critical Survey, chapter 2.

F. Capra, “Emptiness and form,” from The Tao of Physics, chapter 14. (electronic

              reserve).

J. Polkinghorne, “Does God act in the physical world” from Belief in God in an Age of

                           Science (electronic reserve).

 

10/16 First paper, an 8-10 page critical review of  F. Capra, “Emptiness and form,”  and J. Polkinghorne, “Does God act in the physical world” is due at the beginning of class today. No extensions will be given.

 

                                   Life and Evolution

10/16 –11/6

H. Rolston, Science and Religion, chapter 3

Ian Barbour, When Science Meets Religion, chapter 4.

Michael Ruse, Can A Darwinian be a Christian? Chapters 1, 3-7, 11-12, epilogue.

 

[No class 10/30]

 

11/13. Second paper, an 8-10 page critical review of H. Rolston, Science and Religion, chapter 3, is due at the beginning of class today. No extensions will be given.

 

                                          Mind, Brain, and Soul

11/13-11/27

J.W. Jones, “Mind, Brain and Spirit – A clinician’s Perspective – Or why I am not afraid of Dualism.” (electronic Reserve)

Ian Barbour, When Science Meets Religion, chapter 5.

 

[No class 11/20]

                             

                           Beyond the warfare of Religion and Science

12/4-12/11

Ian Barbour, When Science Meets Religion, chapter 1.

H. Rolston, Science and Religion, chapters 6, 7

J. W. Jones, The Redemption of Matter, chapter 7

 

12/11 Last day of class. Topic for the final essay will be handed out.

 

12/18 Final essays due in the Religion Dept. office by noon today. No extensions will be given.