You are visitor #

Last Update April 15, 2014
Professor David P. Redlawsk
Co-Editor, Political Psychology

Prof. of Political Science
& Dir., Rutgers-Eagleton Poll
Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers University
191 Ryders Ln. New Brunswick, NJ 08901
redlawsk@rutgers.edu
(732) 932-9384 ext. 285


My Courses Spring 2014

790:344 Public Opinion

 

COMING LATE THIS YEAR: The Positive Case for Negative Campaigning, a new book by Kyle Mattes and David Redlawsk from the University of Chicago Press.

In Why Iowa? How Caucuses and Sequential Elections Improve the Presidential Nominating Process, my co-authors Caroline Tolbert and Todd Donovan and I explore the place of Iowa in a sequential system. We conclude that despite its problems and limitations, the Iowa Caucuses provide significant benefits in the existing presidential nominating system. The book can be ordered on Amazon and you can see a preview of it on Google Books. It's published by the University of Chicago Press. My co-author Caroline Tolbert and I published a piece in the New York Times online "Room for Debate" late in 2011 about what Iowans wanted from their caucus candidates.



Why is it hard for voters to make decisions in a primary?
AP science writer Malcolm Ritter has a story about this, quoting me, as well as my colleague and co-author Rick Lau.


A short piece I published in the New York Times online edition about how motivated reasoning can help explain resistance to facts showing President Obama was born in Hawai'i.


Research, Vita, and Personal Stuff
Updated 4/8/2014

Looking for the Lau/Redlawsk Dynamic Process Tracing System? CLICK HERE!

My Courses

Recent Books and Papers

Gender Stereotypes, Information Search, and Voting Behavior in Political Campaigns (2013, Political Behavior doi:10.1007/s11109-013-9232-6)
Why Iowa? (2011, University of Chicago Press)
Framing Labels and Immigration Policy Attitudes (2011, Political Behavior 33:433-455)
Voters, Emotions, and Race in 2008 (2010, PRQ 53(4): 875-889)
The Affective Tipping Point (2010, Political Psychology 31(4): 563-593)


Copyright 1999-2013, David P. Redlawsk