Basement-Involved Shortening

 
"Map view" of top surface of scaled clay model of basement-involved dip-slip reverse faulting. The clay was deformed as a fault system propagated upward from a rigid basement block into the clay. Short, discontinuous bright and dark features are synthetic and antithetic normal faults cutting anticlinal fold developed in the HW of the master fault. Continuous bright line marks surface trace of master fault. Note that the normal faults are subparallel to the trend of the deformed zone, a diagnostic feature of orthogonal deformation.
"Map view" of top surface of scaled clay model of basement-involved oblique-slip reverse faulting. The clay was deformed as a fault system propagated upward from a rigid basement block into the clay. Short, discontinuous bright and dark features are synthetic and antithetic normal faults cutting anticlinal fold developed in the HW of the master fault. Semi-continuous bright line marks surface trace of master fault. Note that the normal faults are oblique to the trend of the deformed zone, a diagnostic feature of oblique deformation.
Vertical slice through clay model of basement-involved oblique reverse faulting. The slice was prepared after the clay had dried and hardened. Faults cutting the uppermost yellow clay layer correspond to those shown in the middle panel. The anticline in the HW block is cut by mostly synthetic reverse fault. A cross section for an oblique shortening model would look very sim ilar. The experimental models were run at Mobil Technology Company by Sarah Tindall, Gloria Eisenstadt, Martha Withjack, and Roy W. Schlische.