Office for the Promotion of Women in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics
Department of Anthropology
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Faculty List (alphabetically)

Ahearn, Laura M.
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Ahearn, Laura M.
Associate Professor

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Phone: 732-932-5298

Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1994

Department of Anthropology, School of Arts and Sciences, New Brunswick; Rutgers

Areas of Interest: Gender, Kinship, Agency, and Marriage in Nepal.



Bonilla, Yarimar
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Bonilla, Yarimar
Assistant Professor

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Ph.D. Socio-Cultural Anthropology, University of Chicago, 2008

Department of Anthropology, School of Arts and Sciences, New Brunswick; Rutgers

Areas of Interest: I teach and write about social movements, political imaginaries, colonial legacies and historical memory in the non-sovereign Caribbean and the French Outremer. I focus particularly on the non-sovereign Caribbean: societies with lingering colonial relationships and ambiguous political identities that disrupt traditional understandings of citizenship, nationality, sovereignty, and autonomy. I am particularly attentive to the political possibilities that exist outside of the traditional rubrics of state and nation building, and to the formation of political identities that disrupt the assumed relationships between a land, a people, and a state. These concerns have combined with an interest in the role of history in the Caribbean political imagination, and the ways in which Caribbean populations understand and negotiate their past – particularly their experiences with colonialism and slavery. My first book grounds these questions in an ethnographic study of labor activism in the French Caribbean island of Guadeloupe. I argue that in the wake of what some describe as “failed” nationalist movements, a new kind of labor politics has emerged throughout the Former French colonies that combines the ideological and tactical repertoires of anti-colonial struggles with the political strength of the French labor tradition. The result is a form of “postcolonial syndicalism” that infuses traditional labor struggles with battles over collective memory, creole language politics, cultural revalorization, and nontraditional claims to self-determination. However, unlike the iconic forms of post-war anti-colonialism from which these labor movements emerged, these new political actors do not seek “national liberation” or political independence. Instead they are attempting to carve out alternative forms of political and economic autonomy within the context of French and European integration. In addition to my work in Guadeloupe, I am also in the process of developing a larger program of comparative research in the non-sovereign Caribbean in order to re-theorize the colonial legacies and contemporary politics of the region. I contend that we need to examine non-sovereignty as a model, not just for non-independent territories, but also for the nominally sovereign territories within and beyond the Caribbean that are mired in postcolonial crises of structural adjustment, international trade regulations, NGO shadow states, post disaster recovery, and the (often inadvertent) effects of international aid. By approaching the region through the frame of the “non-sovereign” I seek to break with the linguistic divides that have plagued the field of Caribbean studies in order to bring together research on the French, English, Spanish, and Dutch speaking Caribbean and to highlight points of commonality in both the historical trajectories and contemporary political forms and processes of the region.



Cachel, Susan M.
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Cachel, Susan M.
Associate Professor

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Phone: 732-932-9475

Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1976

Department of Anthropology, School of Arts and Sciences, New Brunswick; Rutgers

Areas of Interest: Human and non-human primate evolution, palaeoanthropology, evolutionary theory, primatology, vertebrate palaeontology.



Haugerud, Angelique
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Haugerud, Angelique
Associate Professor

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Phone: 732-932-2643


Department of Anthropology, School of Arts and Sciences, New Brunswick; Rutgers

Areas of Interest: Globalization, economic neoliberalism, cultural politics, social movements, satirical activism, political ecology, land tenure, democratization, social change; Africa, U.S.



Hodgson, Dorothy L.
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Hodgson, Dorothy L.
Professor & Chair

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Phone: 732-932-0633

Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1995

Department of Anthropology, School of Arts and Sciences, New Brunswick; Rutgers

Areas of Interest: Cultural anthropology, historical anthropology, cultural politics, gender, ethnicity, colonialism, missionization, indigenous rights, pastoralism, transnationalism, social movements, research methodologies, Africa.



Magaña, Rocío
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Magaña, Rocío
Assistant Professor

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Phone: 732-932-9886

PhD in Anthropology, University of Chicago, 2008

Department of Anthropology, School of Arts and Sciences, New Brunswick; Rutgers

Areas of Interest: I am currently completing my dissertation-based book, Bodies on the Line: Life, Death, and Authority on the Arizona-Mexico Border, which offers an ethnographic analysis of contemporary struggles over border control, humanitarian intervention, and unauthorized migration in the desert regions of the U.S.-Mexico Boundary. The book draws on over 30 months of multi-sited field research between 2002 and 2007 focused on the politics and practices surrounding the rescue, death and the recovery of bodies of border-crossers in the Sonoran Desert region. By tracing the productive tension between efforts aimed at protecting the border from unauthorized migration vs. efforts aimed at protecting unauthorized migrants from the fatal effects of extreme desert exposure, I offer a critical analysis of the political potency that these migrants come to bear through the damage to their bodies and the mobilization of their images and stories. Though this analysis, my work speaks to the contemporary regimes of exclusion as well as the articulation and contestation of power over people and space.



Mascia-Lees, Frances
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Mascia-Lees, Frances
Professor

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Phone: 732-932-8757

PH.D., State University of New York, 1983

Department of Anthropology, School of Arts and Sciences, New Brunswick; Rutgers

Areas of Interest: Gender, Race, Difference, The Body, Psychological Anthropology, Consumer Culture, Cultural Encounters, Cultural Representation and Ethnographic Responsibility; Theory and History.



Vogel, Erin
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Vogel, Erin
Assistant Professor

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Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook University, 2004

Department of Anthropology, School of Arts and Sciences, New Brunswick; Rutgers

Areas of Interest: In the Laboratory for Primate Dietary Ecology, we study how ecological variation influences the behavior (feeding and social), morphology, and physiology of non-human primates. We have three main goals: 1. Determine the selection pressures that have led to the variation in primate dietary traits and behavior 2. Bridge the fields of ecology, behavior, physiology, and morphology to better understand energy acquisition and use in non-human primates 3. Explore how primate behavior can inform us about human evolutionary hypotheses These goals are driving our field and laboratory research on diverse subjects in anthropology, ecology, and evolutionary biology. The guiding principle of our lab is that the species and methods used must be appropriate for the particular evolutionary question asked. Members of my lab use a diverse tool kit to answer their research questions including behavioral observations of primates in their natural habitats, quantifying the abundance and distribution of food resources, nutritional analyses of foods, quantifying material properties of foods, mathematical modeling, and collecting urine, fecal and blood samples for laboratory analyses to better understand the causes and consequences of selecting particular food items. All of these methods increase our understanding of how and why primates select their diets and how they cope with periods of food scarcity.



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