Office for the Promotion of Women in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics
Faculty Profile
Davis, Robin L.
Robin's Profile
Davis, Robin L.
Executive Vice Dean

Email
Website
Phone: 732-445-0440

Ph.D., Stanford University, 1987

Professional Summary/CV [.PDF]

Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, School of Arts and Sciences, New Brunswick; Rutgers
Areas of Interest
Neural encoding in the auditory system.
Teaching Areas
Neurobiology, electrophysiology, and immunocytochemistry.
Memberships and Professional Service
Society for Neuroscience, Association for Research in Otolaryngology, and the American Speech-Language and Hearing Association. Chair, ARO Long Range Planning Committee (2005-2008).
Davis, Robin L.
Robin with students in her lab, Jim and Lucy.
Grants, Honors, and Awards
Principal Investigator, NIH RO1, "Ion Channel Diversity in Primary-Auditory Neurons," 1992-2007; Principal Investigator, NIH RO1, "NIDCD Administrative Supplements for Microarrays," 2000-2001; Co- Principal Investigator, NIH RO1, "Studies of SPP in Auditory Ontogeny," 1991-1994; Investigator, Deafness Research Foundation, "Single-Channel Activity in Mammalian Primary-Auditory Neurons," 1992.
Academic Interests and Plans
My laboratory is focused on understanding the complex neuronal signaling that is responsible for transmitting acoustic information into the brain. A number of sophisticated techniques are used in my lab to evaluate spiral ganglion neurons, which are the first neural elements in auditory system. Electrical signals transmitted by auditory neurons in vitro are directly observed by using patch clamp electrophysiology, the voltage-gated ion channels that shape the signals are visualized with fluorescent immunocytochemistry, and the genes involved in regulating and carrying out these processes are evaluated with molecular biological approaches such as quantitative RT-PCR. Our goal is to use a broad array of approaches to study a specific group of neurons with known functional significance, thus using them as a window into brain.