Office for the Promotion of Women in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics
Faculty Profile
Wright, Rebecca N.
Rebecca's Profile
Wright, Rebecca N.
Associate Professor; Deputy Director, DIMACS

Email
Website
Phone: 732-445-5931

Ph.D., Yale University, 1994

Professional Summary/CV [.PDF]

Department of Computer Science, School of Arts and Sciences, New Brunswick; New Brunswick; Rutgers
Areas of Interest
Computer and Communications Security (particularly in the areas of Privacy, Cryptographic Protocols, and Fault-tolerant Distributed Computing), Designing Protocols, Systems, and Services (especially those that perform their specified computational or communication functions even if some of the participants or underlying components behave maliciously).
Teaching Areas
Theory of Distributed Computation, Applied Cryptography and Network Security, Cryptography Protocols.
Memberships and Professional Service
Lecturer, UC Berkeley TRUST Center's Women's Institute in Summer Enrichment program, University of California at Berkeley, 2006; Editorial Board, Journal of Computer Security (IOS Press), 2001-present; Board of Directors, International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR), 2001-2005; Lecturer, Cryptographic Complexity Theory, IAS/Park City Mathematics Institute, Institute for Advanced Studies, 2000; Principal Technical Staff Member, AT&T Labs - Research, 1999-2002; Member of Technical Staff, AT&T Bell Laboratories, 1994-1996.
Grants, Honors, and Awards
National Academy of Engineering, Armstrong Endowment for Young Engineers, Gilbreth Lectureship, 2008; Co-Principal Investigator, DIMACS Special Focus on Algorithmic Foundations of the Internet, NSF, 2007-2009; Master of Engineering, Honoris Causa, Stevens Institute of Technology, 2006; Principal Investigator, Mitigating Exploits of the Current Interdomain Routing Infrastructure, NSF, 2007-2010; Principal Investigator, Incentive-Compatible Protocols, NSF, 2005-2008.
Academic Interests and Plans
My research spans the area of information security, including cryptography, privacy, foundations of computer security, and fault-tolerant distributed computing. Recent work includes privacy-preserving data mining, secure multiparty approximations, and improved bounds for Byzantine agreement in the shared memory model. My ongoing research goals are the design of protocols, systems, and services that perform their specified computational or communication functions even if some of the participants or underlying components behave maliciously, and that balance individual needs such as privacy with collective needs such as network survivability and public safety.