Rutgers New Brunswick/Piscataway Campus

Botanical Art of the Pinelands: Images for Media Use

 

 

posted by Dr. Lena Struwe (struwe@aesop.rutgers.edu)

for the exhibit: Botanical Art of the Pinelands (2007)

click on thumbnails for larger image size

All images are copyrighted and are NOT in the public domain. They can only be used for the purpose of this exhibit unless additional permission granted.

 

Artist: Robin A. Jess, watercolor

Title: Pine-Barrens Gentian (Gentiana autumnalis)

Copyright: Robin A. Jess 1993  (RJess5928@aol.com; www.RobinAJessBotanicalArt.com)

OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact copyright holder for internet use.

More information about image: Among the most beautiful fall-blooming flowers in the Pinelands is the pine barren gentian, which reaches its northern limit here. It grows in open, wet pine forests and road sides, and can easily be recognized by its dark-blue flowers with fringed folds between the petals, and grass-like, opposite leaves. Most of its relatives grow in the Rockies, Alps, and Himalayas, and gentians are among the most bitter plants known. (Gentiana autumnalis; Gentianaceae)

Artist: Robin A. Jess, watercolor

Title: Pitch Pine (Pinus rigida)

Copyright: Robin A. Jess 1993 (RJess5928@aol.com; www.RobinAJessBotanicalArt.com)

OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact copyright holder for internet use.

More information about image:  The pitch pine is the pine of the Pine Barrens.  It forms large forests on the sandy soil and can tolerate very drought- and nutrient-poor conditions. This pine resprouts after forest fires, and is often shrub-like or gnarly in its shape with shoots coming directly out from the tree trunk. It is named after pitch, a resin used to seal cracks in wooden boats, and it was also used for firewood and charcoal in New Jersey. (Pinus rigida; Pinaceae)

Artist: Rosalie Sherman, photo

Title: Pitch Pines, highbush blueberries, and sheep laurel, Franklin Parker Preserve, NJ

Copyright: Rosalie Sherman 2004

OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image: Typical Pineland forest with pitch pine trees and understory of huckleberries and highbush blueberries.

Artist: Rosalie Sherman, photo

Title: Pine Barren Gentian, Warren Grove, Franklin Parker Preserve, NJ

Copyright: Rosalie Sherman 2004

OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image: Among the most beautiful fall-blooming flowers in the Pinelands is the pine barren gentian, which reaches its northern limit here. It grows in open, wet pine forests and road sides, and can easily be recognized by its dark-blue flowers with fringed folds between the petals, and grass-like, opposite leaves. Most of its relatives grow in the Rockies, Alps, and Himalayas, and gentians are among the most bitter plants known. (Gentiana autumnalis; Gentianaceae)

Artist: Rosalie Sherman, photo

Title: Pines reflected in pond, Warren Grove, Franklin Parker Preserve, NJ

Copyright: Rosalie Sherman 2004

OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image:

Artist: Jim Davidson, photo

Title: Handful of Sphagnum, Albert List botanizing, 1992

Copyright: Jim Davidson. If you want to use this image or the unmodified version of this image, contact Jim Davidson directly at jim@jembe.com

More information about image: "We were on an old logging road in the mountains near Mehoopany PA.  By that time he could not walk without great pain, his leg braces are visible in the one image.  So he crawled around in the ditch next to the road and pulled up some Sphagnum (peat moss) for closer inspection.  We collected muddy bags of interesting plants and that night at the kitchen table he drew them in pencil, to be inked in over the long winter." Jim Davidson

 

Artist: Jim Davidson, photo

Title: Sphagnum details, Albert List botanizing, 1992

Copyright: Jim Davidson. If you want to use this image or the unmodified version of this image, contact Jim Davidson directly at jim@jembe.com

More information about image: see above

 

Artist: Jim Davidson, photo

Title: Albert List with Hydrastis canadensis, April 1997

Copyright: Jim Davidson. If you want to use this image or the unmodified version of this image, contact Jim Davidson directly at jim@jembe.com

More information about image: "And my favorite image of AL, is of him lying in a forest in perfectly comfortable repose, on top of several Hydrastis flowers in their prime.  He is providing me with a dark background with his left boot so one of the yellow flowers is visible in the image.  There were many thousands of blossoms over an acre or so and his smile has the satisfaction of showing me this beautiful secret place." Jim Davidson

Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) is a medicinal plant native to New Jersey.

Artist: Albert List, ink on cardboard

Title: Pinelands habitat

Copyright: Albert List. OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image: A cedar swamp in the Pinelands is the home to many different species of plants and animals.

Artist: Albert List, ink on cardboard

Title: Pitch pine (Pinus rigida)

Copyright: Albert List. OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image: The pitch pine is the pine of the Pine Barrens.  It forms large forests on the sandy soil and can tolerate very drought- and nutrient-poor conditions. This pine resprouts after forest fires, and is often shrub-like or gnarly in its shape with shoots coming directly out from the tree trunk. It is named after pitch, a resin used to seal cracks in wooden boats, and it was also used for firewood and charcoal in New Jersey. (Pinus rigida; Pinaceae)

Artist: Albert List, ink on cardboard

Title: Walnut and butternut twigs (Juglans nigra & J. cinerea)

Copyright: Albert List. OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image: Twigs of plants are not only brown sticks, in fact; they often contain marks of specific species characteristics. The walnut twigs shown here in List’s drawing, are easily identifiable by their leaf scars with their three scars from the vascular strands that lead into each leaf.  In each leaf axil is the bud for next year’s growth, ready to grow in spring. Black walnut and butternut are introduced in the Pinelands, and prefer more nutrient-rich soils (Juglans nigra & J. cinerea; Juglandaceae)

Artist: Albert List, ink on cardboard

Title: Dragon mouth (Arethusa bulbosa)

Copyright: Albert List. OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image: The orchid called dragon-mouth (Arethusa bulbosa) grows in mossy, open Sphagnum wetlands in the Pinelands, and also occurs in other states of northeastern US and Canada. Arethusa was a named after a beautiful Greek nymph by Linnaeus and is the only species in its genus in the world. The pink flowers get pollinated by deceiving inexperienced bumblebees into visiting, since it is not offering any reward such as pollen or nectar.

Artist: Albert List, ink on cardboard

Title: Red Chokeberry (Photinia pyrifolia)

Copyright: Albert List. OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image: Red Chokeberry is widespread in swamps and damp thickets in New Jersey and also found in the Pinelands. It is a small shrub with an abundance of white flowers in early summer. The fruit is edible but is very tart. (Photinia pyrifolia (formerly Aronia arbutifolia); Rosaceae)

Artist: Albert List, ink on cardboard

Title: Prickly bog sedge (Carex atlantica)

Copyright: Albert List. OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image: Sedges of the genus Carex have no petals and their pistil is hidden inside a bottle-shaped perigynium. The prickly bog sedge has its flowers arranged in tight clusters, like spiny balls, along the stem. This species is common in open wetlands of the Pinelands. (Carex atlantica; Cyperaceae.

Artist: Albert List, ink on cardboard

Title: Bog yellow-eyed grass (Xyris difformis)

Copyright: Albert List. OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image: The bog yellow-eyed grass is not a grass at all, but has a typical monocot flowers with six petals. The flowers are partly hidden behind bracts and the leaves are long and narrow like grass-leaves.  It is a typical Pineland species and is endangered in New Jersey. (Xyris difformis; Xyridaceae).

Artist: Albert List, ink on cardboard

Title: Bog aster (Oclemena nemoralis)

Copyright: Albert List. OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image: The bog aster is a true Pinelands species, that here reaches its southern range in the US. It grows in open cedar swamps and flowers with light purple flowers in early fall. (Oclemena nemoralis (formerly Aster nemoralis); Asteraceae)

Artist: Albert List, ink on cardboard

Title: Fruits of Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis)

Copyright: Albert List. OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image: The strikingly red Cardinal Flower is native to peripheral areas to the Pine Barrens, where it can generally be found along wetland streams. It is common in more coastal areas and is widespread in the United States. Lobelias have a very particular pollen mechanism. The pollen, which is shed into a tube formed by the fused anthers, is pushed up by the growing style. When a pollinator visits, pressure on the tube squeezes out pollen, like toothpaste from a tube, onto the pollinator. This drawing shows the capsules shedding their seeds. (Lobelia cardinalis; Campanulaceae)

Artist: Albert List, ink on cardboard

Title: Eastern Marsh Fern (Thelypteris palustris)

Copyright: Albert List. OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image: The Eastern Marsh Fern is another widespread, common species following the wetlands corridors into the forests of the Pinelands, where it is associated with upland agriculture and developed land. Ferns l don’t have flowers or seeds, instead they spread by tiny spores from organs on their lower leaf surfaces. (Thelypteris palustris; Thelypteridaceae)

Artist: Albert List, ink on cardboard

Title:  Chanterelle (Cantherellus cibarius)

Copyright: Albert List. OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image: A wild delicacy around the world, the yellow chanterelle, is here captured as it grows in the forest floor, in symbiosis with birch, oak and pine trees. (Cantherellus cibarius; Cantharellaceae)

Artist: Albert List, ink on cardboard

Title: Lichen (Cladonia macilenta)

Copyright: Albert List. OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image: Cup lichens are strange looking creatures. They grow on soil or rotten wood, and  from a base of small scale like lichen ‘leaves’, from which finger or trumpet-shaped extensions with red fruiting bodies on the top are situated. (Cladonia macilenta; Cladoniaceae).

Artist: Albert List, ink on cardboard

Title: Tube lichen (Hypogymnia physodes)

Copyright: Albert List. OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image: Tube lichen is a tree-growing lichen with hollow lobes, which has given its name physodes (= bladder). It is one of few species that can survive in areas with highly polluted air.(Hypogymnia physodes; Parmeliaceae).

Artist: Albert List, ink on cardboard

Title: Beard lichen (Usnea lapponica/fulvoreagens)

Copyright: Albert List. OK to use for printed articles about this exhibit, credit copyright holder. Contact Lena Struwe about internet use.

More information about image: Beard lichens are typical of old forests where they can hang as long shaggy old beards from tree branches. They do not survive forest fires well, so are often resticted to wetter parts of the forest where few fires reach. (Usnea lapponica/fulvoreagens; Parmeliaceae).

 
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