VICARIO LABORATORY
            Busch - Psychology 332
                (732) 445-2835

 

David S. Vicario, PhD    Professor      Faculty Webpage
                                                                                                                                    To listen to a presentation of laboratory results on song learning:

                                                                                                          From Birdsong to Baby Talk: Studies of Language Development
Mimi Le Phan, PhD        Assistant Research Professor                       http://www.nyas.org/ebrief/miniEB.asp?ebriefID=615

Jianqiang Xiao, PhD        Research Associate

 

Manda Pierce, BA             Laboratory Researcher III                                                       

Graduate Student(s)
Kai Lu
Kathleen Yoder
Lillian Yang
Primoz Ravbar (CCNY)

Undergraduate(s)
Utsav Aiya
Mona Sisodia
Tom Ziv
Willa Gao



RECENT PUBLICATIONS

Phan M.L. and Vicario D.S. (2010) Hemispheric differences in processing of vocalizations depend on early experience.

Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 107:2301-6.

Vicario, D.S. (2008) Patterns of learning, memory, and vocal production in the songbird brain.    Vicario (2008) pdf
In Advances in Psychology: Human Learning: Biology, Brain and Neuroscience (Guadagnoli, Benjamin, deBelle Etnyre, and Polk, Eds), Elsevier
139:287-300.

Terleph, T.A, Lu, K. and Vicario, D.S. (2008) Response properties of the auditory telencephalon in songbirds change with recent experience and season.
PLoS ONE
3(8):e2854.35.                                                                                              Terleph et al (2008) pdf

Pinaud R., Terleph T.A., Tremere L.A., Phan M.L. Dagostin A.A., Lećo R.M., Mello C.V., Vicario D.S. (2008) Inhibitory network interactions shape the auditory processing of natural communication signals in the songbird auditory forebrain.
J. Neurophysiol.
100:441-55.36.                                                                                      Pinaud et al (2008) pdf

Terleph  T.A., Mello C.V. and Vicario D.S.  (2007) Species differences in processing dynamics in songbird auditory telencephalon.
Dev Neurobiol.
67:1498-510.                                                                                          Terleph et al (2007) pdf

Phan M.L., Pytte C.L. and Vicario D.S. (2006) Early auditory experience generates long-lasting auditory memories that may subserve vocal learning in songbirds.
Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 103:1088-93.                                                                                          Phan et al (2006) pdf

Vicario, D.S. (2004) Using Learned Calls to Study Sensory-Motor Integration in Songbirds.
Annals NY Acad. Sci. 1016: 246-262                                                                               Vicario (2004) pdf



CURRENT TEACHING

Physiological Psychology                                   Fall 2008
01:830:313:06       M-W (4)  1:40-3:00pm        PHARM 115
                                   PhysioPsychsyllabusFall08
Physiological Psychology                                   Fall 2008
01:830:313:07       M-W (5)  3:20-4:40pm        PHARM 115      
                             PhysioPsychsyllabusFall08

This course will provide an introduction to the anatomical structure, electrophysiology and neurochemistry of the brain.  This basic information will then be used to explore the neural mechanisms of behavior, ranging from vision to movement to schizophrenia. Ultimately, all our sensations, thoughts, feelings and actions reflect brain processes. A better understanding of our own brains can thus help us to understand ourselves.


Problems in Behavioral Neuroscience: Neuroethological Approaches to Behavior Spring 2007

#16:830:646:02   Tues  9:50-12:30      Psychology 301
    This seminar will focus on the neural mechanisms of natural behavioral adaptations in a variety of animal species, using Behavioral Neurobiology by Carew as a framework, supplemented by readings from the primary literature.  We will explore the general principles of neural function that underlie the specialized sensory and motor capabilities of individual species.  Case examples will include behavioral patterns that involve the integration of sensory information in order to guide future action, such as navigation, foraging, communication, and learning.  Participants will be asked to review selected topics and present their findings to the whole class.



______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
PAST TEACHING


UNDERGRADUATE
Physiological Psychology
                                   Fall 2005
01:830:313:06       M-W (4)  1:40-3:00pm        PHARM 115
                                 
Physiological Psychology
                                   Fall 2005
01:830:313:07       M-W (5)  3:20-4:40pm        PHARM 115
                        
Physiological Psychology                                    Spring 2005
01:830:313:04       Tu-Th (5)  2:50-4:10pm        PHARM 111                                   


Comparative Psychology
                                   Fall 2004

01:830:315:01      Tu-Th (5)   2:50-4:10pm        SERC 118                                      
Comparative Psychology                                    Fall 2003

830:315:01      M-W (5)                                      ARC 107
HONORS:Comparative Psychology Course Description
  Spring 2003
#54244  830:315:H1  T-Th 1:10-2:30 PSY 301

    How much of our behavior is determined by innate mechanisms, how much is a reflexive response
to sensory events and how much can change with experience?  The formal study of animal behavior
provides a framework for addressing these questions in the context of evolution.  We will explore
behavioral adaptations in a range of animal species, with an emphasis on natural behaviors whose
function and brain mechanisms are fairly well understood.  Textbook chapters will be supplemented
by readings from the primary literature. Case examples will include behavioral patterns that involve
the integration of sensory information in order to guide future action, such as navigation, foraging,
communication, and learning.  Students will be asked to review selected topics and present their
findings to the whole class.  Student performance will be evaluated on the basis of these presentations
and general class participation, as well as conventional testing.

GRADUATE
Problems in Behavioral Neuroscience: Neurobiological Mechanisms and Birdsong Learning    Fall 2004
16:830:646:03           Thurs                                Psychology 301
    This seminar will explore the brain mechanisms of vocal learning in songbirds and the contribution that birdsong studies can make to understanding fundamental neurobiological processes, such as: the effect of experience on neural development; hormonal influences on brain and behavior (sexual dimorphism); neurogenesis and behavior; auditory pattern processing and memory for complex sounds;  motor pattern generation; basal ganglia and motor learning; gene expression related to sensory processing and motor production.

Problems in Behavioral Neuroscience: Neuroethological Approaches to Behavior
Fall 2003

#16:830:646:02   Tues (4) 1:10-3:50      Psychology 301
    This seminar will focus on the neural mechanisms of natural behavioral adaptations in a variety of animal species, using Behavioral Neurobiology by Carew as a framework, supplemented by readings from the primary literature.  We will explore the general principles of neural function that underlie the specialized sensory and motor capabilities of individual species.  Case examples will include behavioral patterns that involve the integration of sensory information in order to guide future action, such as navigation, foraging, communication, and learning.  Participants will be asked to review selected topics and present their findings to the whole class.